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Intro


 

 

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Intro


 

 

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What is SLP?


Speech-Language Pathology

What is SLP?


Speech-Language Pathology


What does a Speech-Language Pathologist do?

A pediatric speech-language pathologist (SLP) assesses a child's speech clarity, vocabulary, sentence structure, and social language abilities and uses a variety of standardized and informal assessment tools to determine if the child has specific speech or language impairments. This information is gathered along with observations of the child, parent interview, and information from the referring physician or agency, to determine a diagnosis and then, if necessary, provide suggestions for interventions to improve the child's speech and language skills. The SLP sets goals for speech and language skills based on what is known about typical language in children. At times the intervention is very structured and at other times the SLP follows the child's interests and uses more indirect methods of facilitating language. We stress real communication so the child is communicating for a reason, not just imitating or repeating words.

Speech and language is more than the words a child uses and begins far earlier than when we see a child use his or her first word. Infants communicate through smiles and sounds, and are already building intentional communication by the time they are 9 months old; not in words yet but through looks, gaze, and sounds. 

When we assess a child's communication, we look at what the child is doing and compare that with what typically developing children are doing at that age in a number of areas. When we evaluate children, we may assess their ability to understand and use language, the clarity and fluency of their speech, and how they use language including gestures, socially.

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST

Children have many other communication problems such as stuttering and voice problems and a SLP is trained to evaluate and provide treatment for children with those disabilities as well. A SLP is also part of the team who assesses feeding and swallowing issues in children and provides intervention. Some children, especially in the preschool years, cannot use verbal communication and we often provide families with alternative ways of helping the child communicate such as pictures and sign. Those methods do not stop a child from talking but instead help the child develop intentional and complex non-word communication. 


 

Speech-language pathologists work in schools, early intervention settings, clinics and hospitals, and in private practice. Buckendorf Associates is a group of SLPs who provide individual and group treatment in our office for children with a wide range of communication issues. 

Parents can contact the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) for referral information and for publications about speech and language development. 

ASHA can be contacted at 1-800-638-8255 or on the web at www.asha.org for that information.

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Resources & Related


Resources & Related Sites

Resources & Related


Resources & Related Sites

Links to : 

Building Communication - Early Ideas (155kb PDF)

An Article by Dr. G. Robert Buckendorf

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)

ASHA is the professional, scientific, and credentialing association for more than 123,000 members and affiliates who are audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and speech, language, and hearing scientists.

Welcome to the Oregon Speech-Language & Hearing Association (OHSHA)

OSHA is recognized as the official professional organization for Oregon speech-language pathologists and audiologists by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

Help Autism Now Society (HANS)

The Help Autism Now Society (HANS) was founded in 2002 by a physician and nurse, Paul and Linda, parents of a child severely affected with autism from birth. Despite over 40 years of combined medical experience they discovered that they had not received any training in autism. As a result they decided to develop a program that would greatly facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of autism, so that families would not suffer needlessly as a result of delayed diagnosis

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NICID)

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), conducts and supports research in the normal and disordered processes of hearing, balance, taste, smell, voice, speech, and language.

Identification and Evaluation of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

An article from Pediatrics, the Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics

Management of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

An article from Pediatrics, the Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics

Oregon Board of Examiners for Speech -
Language Pathology & Audiology

The Board of Examiners for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology licenses and regulates the performance of speech-language pathologists and audiologists for consumer protection in Oregon.

Super Duper Publications

Fun Learning Materials for Kids!

Meadowood Springs

Meadowood Springs Speech and Hearing Camp is home to the happiest campers! Every summer, our Eastern Oregon camp site becomes home to children with speech, hearing, and language disorders.

How To Learn English

Expert advice on learning the English language. Whether you're learning English as a second language or helping your children learn English, you'll find expert advice here on: pronunciation, grammar, punctuation and how to communicate in English.


Videos of Dr Buckendorf's Speaking Engagements : 

Engagement and Mutual Exchange: Lessons from Autism - Bob Buckendorf

Life Lessons Gained from Decades of Teaching Children with Autism - G. Robert Buckendorf, PhD, CCC-SLP

Dr. Buckendorf has worked as a speech and language pathologist with children with autism for 30 years. He shares 2 critical concepts that children with autism need to learn. One is the importance of initiation which means opening the dialogue with words, looks or gestures. The other concept is the importance of taking turns in interaction. How do these concepts transfer to your business world? They are both important as we have to take initiation and co-operate with others. Dr. Buckendorf illustrates this with examples from his life long work with children with autism. G. Robert Buckendorf, PhD, CCC-SLP is President and CEO of Buckendorf Associates, LLC

The Lost Art of Communication - G. Robert Buckendorf, PhD

How to listen and how to get others to listen to you

Communication is key to success in personal and business relationships. Most of us think of communication as us talking to others: I want to make sure others hear what I have to say and I’m primarily concerned with advancing my own agenda. I often listen only to “fix” others or share from my own experience or listen with an ear to figure out what I am going to say next. However, the key to effective communication is to become a better listener. In this presentation, we will discuss some of these roadblocks to effective listening and instead present strategies to become a better listener- which means I become a better employer and employee, leader, parent, and friend. Becoming a better listener takes practice and commitment, but is an opportunity to learn to respect others. Others are more interested in listening to us when we first really listen to them. Strategies such as use of open-ended questions, reflecting back the message to the speaker, and the importance of body language will be offered. Dr. Buckendorf will present illustrations from his lifelong work with children with disabilities as part of this presentation. G. Robert Buckendorf, PhD, CCC-SLP, is Speech Language Pathologist and Manager of Buckendorf Associates, LLC